Tamir Rice

Today marks the two-year anniversary of the death of 12-year-old Tamir Rice, who was fatally shot by a White Cleveland police officer while playing with a toy gun.

"As a descendant of people who were denied the right to read, to now have the opportunity to serve and lead the institution that is the national symbol of knowledge, is a historic moment," Carla Hayden said at her swearing-in ceremony.

According to police, one of the officers fired several rounds into an alley, striking Tyre King. King was transported to Nationwide Children's Hospital and listed in critical condition, but did not survive.

The Quicken Loans Arena in downtown Cleveland and the recreation center where Tamir was killed stand just four miles apart, but the space between the priorities of the RNC and the people the sticker represents couldn't be further apart.

Alton Sterling’s death at the hands of Baton Rouge police officers and the recent shooting of Philando Castile, who was shot by Minnesota police during a routine traffic stop, are just two of many that fall into the same category ― Black people being assaulted and killed by police while performing normal, day-to-day tasks.

A video obtained by FOX8 Cleveland shows the police pulling up to the boys as they raise their hands. Authorities also order the young men not to make any sudden moves.

William Pretzer, the museum's senior History Curator, asked the city to delay demolition of the structure in an email Monday.

Cleveland settles wrongful death lawsuit with Tamir Rice's family for $6 million. But the city does not admit to wrongdoing.

In a federal lawsuit, the City of Cleveland has settled with the family of Tamir Rice for $6 million.  Rice, 12, was shot dead by a police officer in 2014 within seconds of responding to an erronous report of a male threatening people in a park with a gun. It was later disclosed that Rice was in […]

Tamir Rice's mother, Samaria Rice, declines to endorse a presidential candidate. Rice explained in a post that none of the solutions she's seen incorporates community input.

Following outrage that the city of Cleveland would charge the estate of a 12-year-old boy fatally shot by police with his last ambulance ride, Mayor Frank Jackson apologized, dropping the $500 claim.

Cuyahoga County prosecutor Timothy J. McGinty says that a law prevents him from releasing grand jury transcripts to the NAACP.