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This isn’t Black History Month, but today is an important day. It is the day that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and several other notable African Americans reached Montgomery, Alabama after marching for four days from Selma.

The Selma-to-Montgomery March for voting rights ended three weeks–and three events–that represented the political and emotional peak of the modern civil rights movement. On “Bloody Sunday,” March 7, 1965, some 600 civil rights marchers headed east out of Selma on U.S. Route 80. They got only as far as the Edmund Pettus Bridge six blocks away, where state and local lawmen attacked them with billy clubs and tear gas and drove them back into Selma. Two days later on March 9, Martin Luther King, Jr., led a “symbolic” march to the bridge. Then civil rights leaders sought court protection for a third, full-scale march from Selma to the state capitol in Montgomery.

Read more about the Selma-to-Montgomery March.

Get more Black History Facts.

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