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We continue our Black Music Month celebration, spotlighting the moments that made history. In the past 50 years, there may not have been a bigger moment than what happened on August 11th, 1973. On that day, a culture was born.

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On August 11th, 1973 at a house party at 1520 Sedgwick Avenue, in the Bronx, New York, it was DJ Kool Herc who is credited with laying down the foundation for what would become known as hip-hop when he started to play extended instrumental sections from funk and soul records – something that had never been done before. By doing this, he created longer beats than were typically heard on dance floors at the time, allowing dancers to get into more intricate footwork and body movements. His style quickly caught on with other DJs who soon began emulating his technique and adding their own flavors to it.

The popularity of these new sounds eventually led to MCs (Master Of Ceremonies) beginning to rap over them during performances at block parties or clubs, giving rise to what we now know as rap music. With this combination of DJing, rapping, and dancing all happening together in one place, the seeds of hip-hop culture were sown.

As more musicians got in on the action, hip-hop began to spread beyond New York City and eventually become a worldwide phenomenon. Today, it continues to evolve and be an integral part of popular culture and Black Music Month is the perfect time to celebrate its origins and impact. So take some time this month to reflect on where it all started and give thanks to those who helped make it what it is today.

 

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The post 1973: The Birth of Hip-Hop | Black Music Month appeared first on Black America Web.

1973: The Birth of Hip-Hop | Black Music Month  was originally published on blackamericaweb.com